Non-Custodial…Mom?

My son has lived with his father, my fearless co-parent and former husband, full-time for 14 years, and only recently did I manage to ditch my iPhone for an hour-long yoga class. I got divorced. My ex assumed residential custody. I never stopped being Mom. You don’t stop being a parent when your child is …

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The Cape

Originally Published in Storyzine Volume I, Issue VII September 2018. Cryss stood, head held high, arms at her waist, and stared into the Toyota’s headlights. The once midnight blue, now faded navy Camry LE glared back at her. Are you up for this? it seemed to ask, stubborn, defiant. Despite its 95,000 miles - nearly …

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To the Mom of Typical Kids I Met at the Gym

Originally Published On The Mighty on October 31, 2018 and The Mother Rogue on July 5, 2018 as Dear ‘Same-Abled’ Mom from the ‘Autism’ Mom You Met at the Gym Yesterday I was blow drying my hair in the women’s locker room mirror when you and your two girls came in from the outdoor pool. You …

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Autism: The Never Ending, Spectacularly Beautiful Snowstorm

Originally published on Various Shades of Blonde Momsense on May 15, 2013. Written by Cristina M. Miller, CP APMP, ReadActively.org. Autism is a genetic spectrum disorder that affects 1 in 59 individuals. When I got divorced and gave up residential custody of my son it was a spectrum disorder that affected 1 in 160 individuals …

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An “Alleged Incapacitated Person” aka OK, Our Child Has A Disability. Now What Do We Do?

Parents see their children with their hearts, not their objective minds. That makes it exceedingly difficult to accept it when the unexpected - a cognitive impairment, a learning disability, a spectrum disorder - starts to impact their child. Michelle Krone, an attorney at Price, Meese, Schulman & D’Arminio, P.C. in Woodcliff Lake, NJ does an …

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